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Lush – Scrubee body butter – Review

December 19, 2017

I’m not a very good gift buyer. At all. In fact, unless you tell me exactly what you want, chances are I will get you a bar of soap for Christmas, your birthday, your graduation, wedding, and even for the birth of your dog’s puppies if that’s a thing.

How amazing then when I stumbled upon a little gem, hidden deep in the trenches of the Canal Walk shopping Centre, selling exactly that – soap!

(Also, I need to put it out there that I’m not fond of big malls like Canal Walk. They are ALWAYS bustling, I end up bumping into everyone, falling over kids or losing mine, and there’s just way too many things I simply cannot afford I wanna scream!)

So while lost in the bustle looking for gifts, I found Lush,  and I could not be more thrilled with my discovery. These little honeys are no ordinary soap; the store is filled to the brim with fresh, handmade, natural products and so many gorgeous pre-wrapped gifts on offer too. However, it’s likely the smell that draws you in at first.

Now, I don’t know if the Lush staff goes to special Customer Service bootcamp, but I’ve been in there a few times and each time I’ve been attentively helped, each product explained in detail and it’s while my arms were being washed (yes, in the shop!) that I fell in love with Scrubee. I mean, there’s plenty of gorgeous products I’m sure you will no doubt get addicted to, like their amaaaaaaazing edible lip scrub, but Scrubby is the reason I keep going back. It is a total body exfoliating and moisturizing bumblebee-shaped soap bar leaving your skin feeling soft and smelling good the entire day.

Scrubee is the perfect gift to anyone for any occasion, and they’ll thank you every time they jump into a shower or someone compliments them for always smelling so good.

You can read more about its ingredients and the amazing reviews here.

 

 

Located: Shop 263 LL, Canal Walk Shopping Centre, Century Blvd, Century City, Cape Town, 7441, South Africa
Website: https://za.lush.com/
Phone: 021 555 3634

 

Happy Shopping!

Health, Slider

Keeping The Family Safe During Summer

December 11, 2017

WATER

According to 2016 stats from the NSRI, 600 children drown every year in South Africa. That’s 10 busses full of children! That’s shocking! What is even more shocking is that I haven’t taken the time to check out the National Sea Rescue Institute’s website before doing my research on this post today.

 Drowning is the leading cause of death among children

Let that sink in for a just a moment. With Summer in full swing, and still a long way to go, this should be alarming for us moms. Although we are always on high alert to ensure the safety and wellbeing of our kids, Summer is definitely a time of year when the alert shifts way up into turbo gear. Even more so when we remember Jane Fraser’s story that shook us all last Summer and the thousands upon thousands stories likes this. It’s always important to continue talking to our children about the dangers of going near the pool unsupervised, or if possible, send them for swimming lessons during the year where they will no doubt also be taught these valuable lessons.

We personally couldn’t be happier with the Arena AWT Soft Armbands we got for the kids last Summer from Sportsman’s Warehouse. It’s possibly the best decision we made to give our then 3 year old, 4 year old and 6 year old more confidence in the pool. A year on and it still provides the little ones with the same comfort and security, whereas the older one now swims on her own.

However, it is always important to be extra careful, especially with smaller kids. Here’s a good place to start:

Make sure the pool is enclosed with a fence
Put your mind at ease by getting your kids a pkaboo Extra Wristband Pool safety Angel
Be prepared, and book a SafeKids first aid training class for you and others responsible for the safety of your children.

 

HEAT

 Hot vehicles are the primary non-crash, vehicle-related killer of children in the US. 

And every Summer it happens in South Africa too, certainly more frequent than it ever should. A child’s body temperature can rise up to five times faster than an adult’s. Opening a Window and parking in the shade while you ‘quickly’ run into the shop is not sufficient safegaurds. Car windows act like a greenhouse: they let in sunlight and heat, trapping it inside the vehicle. It doesn’t take long for a child to suffer from a heat stroke. At a body temperature of 41.7°C, cell damage occurs in a child and internal organs shut down.

Here are a few other important things to be mindful of during the harsh South African Summer:

Always lock your car and if a child is missing, check the swimming-pool first, then the car, including the boot.
Make sure all kids have plenty of water even before they leave the house .
Lather kids in Sunscreen as often as possible during the day while out.
Dress them in lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing.

Look out for these danger signs: 

Dehydration: 

Thirst, dry lips and tongue, lack of energy, and feeling overheated.

Heat cramps: 

Painful cramps of the abdominal muscles, arms, or legs.

Heat exhaustion: 

Dizziness, nausea, vomiting, headaches, weakness, muscle pain and sometimes unconsciousness.

Heat stroke: 

A temperature of 40 degrees Celsius or higher and severe symptoms, including nausea and vomiting, seizures, disorientation or delirium, lack of sweating shortness of breath, unconsciousness, and coma.

 

LARGE CROWDS

Cape Town is ALWAYS chock a block with people from all walks of life when the holidays swing around, making it a scary time to be out and about with the kids. Kids will be kids and the likelihood of them running off for whatever reason is great.

I think it’s important for us as parents and childminders to make a conscious decision when taking our kids into large crowds such as amusement parks, malls, concerts, and beaches, to put away our cell phones and to never, for a second take our eyes off our little treasures (the kids, not the phones).

Either that or leave them home. However, parents get distracted and we don’t always have someone to watch our kids, so if you ever find yourself in a situation where you absolutely have to take your kids into large crowds, then here are a few ideas to keep those wandering ruckers as safe as we possibly can:

write your name and number on the inside of your child’s wrist or on their belly with a permanent marker, or use school clothing labels on the inside of their clothes. This way, should they get lost, the authorities or a good Samaritan will be able to call you immediately.
An alternative, or addition to this, would be to tuck a business card of the Hotel where you’re staying in your kids’ pockets.
Take a family pic before leaving the house or hotel room. This should be easy in the digital obsessed world we live in. Should it be necessary, you will have updated pictures of your kids.
Find ‘safe strangers’ by pointing out park officials, security, or even moms and dads with kids of their own as you make your way through the crowd with your kids. It will be useful and life-saving should you get separated from your child.

 

INSECT BITES

I didn’t think the wasp invasion of Cape Town a couple years back was a big deal until a screaming Jada limped into the house. She was stung by a wasp on her foot. Poor baby. Fortunately, the pain didn’t last too long and she wasn’t allergic or anything, but things could have turned out so much different had she been. However, many are, and some insects (flying and crawling) are poisonous, so how do we protect our inquisitive kids from getting into trouble while playing around the house or out walking in foresty areas?

Teach kids to always steer clear of beehives and other potentially dangerous insect’s territory or call pest control for removal
Wear light coloured clothes as bugs are attracted to darker colours
Opt for insect repellant or unscented products rather than perfumes or scented lotions.
Like sweet smells, insects also love sweet drinks, so look before you drink!

Although most stings and bites are harmless, if allergic or poisonous can be fatal if untreated. When in doubt call 0861 555 777

 

Sources: safekids.co.za / health24.com / health.usnews.com / www.healthline.com / allaboutfencing

 

Stay safe this Summer.

Love,

 

 

Entertainment, Health, Health/Fitness, Slider

Flying high for mental health

November 14, 2017

This year was our family’s first time at the Cape Town International kite festival and it didn’t disappoint one bit. What first attracted me to the event is the great platform it creates to spread the message of mental health. Also, what kid does not love kites? Whether they are flying it or standing-by admiring its beauty up high,  kids are completely captivated by this windswept wonder.

It is so important that we know looking after our mental health is no less important than looking after our physical health. This is the very reason I decided to fly my kite high in support of this initiative, and I encourage everyone to get involved. One just needs to switch on the tv or read the news to see how mental illness is running rampant destroying lives. Cape Mental health brings awareness to this and provides basic care to children and adults suffering from its onslaught.

We arrived at the 23rd kite festival on a true-to-the-Cape windy afternoon in October, which of cause was perfect for the kiters. The kids LOVED all the fun rides and were in awe of the enormous, towering and colourful character kites made by experienced kiters from all over the world.  I cannot even begin to imagine how long it took them to create these beauties. Unfortunately, we just missed the free kite-making sessions earlier in the day and instead headed off to the section especially cordoned-off for the kids to fly their kites that we bought at the festival.

We also enjoyed the live performances by local artists and which added to the already amazing vibe. There was no shortage of food and drinks with plenty of food trucks and we ended up staying so much longer than we planned. We will FOR SURE be back next year.

But of cause, a picture speaks louder than words, so see for yourself!

 

 

 

Keep the conversation going:

 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/CTKiteFest

Facebook event: http://bit.ly/2wTJSFp

Twitter: @CTKiteFest

Instagram: @CTKiteFest

Hashtags: #RightToFly #CTKiteFest

Web: www.capementalhealth.co.za

 

Love,

 

 

Health, Health/Fitness

Porridge Brain Is Real

September 25, 2017

I just remembered how forgetful I always am, so let me jot this down real quick before I forget again.

Do you ever feel like you have to write everything down to remember it later? If you even remember to read what you’ve written in order to know what it is you have to remember.

Confusing, right? Well, that’s exactly what my brain looks like after having three kids! Yet it’s been an age-old debate whether porridge brain is actually “a thing” and if it is, whether it’s a biological or social phenomenon. It’s probably one of the conditions that baffle medics and scientists the most – mainly because we don’t go to the doctor for medication every time we forget something important, it’s not exactly life-threatening (but can be), and it’s not constant like amnesia.

But it’s real. Like the other day when I was driving my kids home from after-care, on a route I follow almost every single day, and for a second or two I completely spaced out and forgot where I was going. Although I’ve been suffering from bouts of forgetfulness since my first pregnancy with Jada 7 years ago,  this particular occurrence scared me the most. Like many other people (even those without kids) I’ve driven in the wrong direction before, like when we moved house and I’d drive to the old house for a good few days thereafter before my brain finally caught on that that’s no longer where we lived. That’s pretty normal and can happen to anyone.

But you know something’s not quite right up there when you leave the keys in the door and go out for a whole afternoon, or you leave the stove on throughout the night – not just once or twice.

After 7 years of being a mom, and going through these and many other mishappenings, I’m convinced that with the birth of each of my three children, I’ve lost a little more function in my brain. Or have I just become busier and therefore more distracted?

Biological or social?

While some moms may have it worse than others, and while porridge brains have not yet been added to the medical journals, it most certainly is there. Often it helps to speak directly to the source if you need more convincing. Bring up the conversation with the mommies at school, or in the doctor’s waiting room, or while enjoying a braai. You’ll soon discover you are not going nuts, you are perfectly imperfect, and that we’re all in this mess together.

So what is causing this strange pregnancy phenomenon?

Medical tests from various doctors around the world have come up with the following explanations:

Biological reasons include the production of more progesterone and estrogen during pregnancy which are hormones that affect all kinds of neurons in the brain; huge surges of oxytocin during birth, which is necessary for the uterus to contract and the body to produce milk, and also affects the brain circuits; and deficiency of iron in the body during pregnancy which, if too low, can cause forgetfulness.

Social reasons include not getting enough sleep and multitasking, in which state nobody’s memory is good, and your priorities change.

Until more research is done on the subject of porridge brains and while we all continue our journey in blissful forgetfulness, “remember” to write things down, get more sleep, and try not to be so stressed and anxious all the time.

Love,

 

 

Image credit: thementalwizzard, 

Sources: WebMD, LivingandLoving

Entertainment, Health, Lifestyle

Cape Town International Kite Festival

August 16, 2017

South Africa’s biggest mental health awareness event – and a  project I was very happy to recently get involved in.

Not only is it the most spectacular family festival of the year, but 100% of profits go to Cape Mental Health to help provide vital mental health services to children and adults in Cape Town and beyond. “We all have the basic right to fly – to explore our abilities, develop our skills and soar freely at home, work, school and in our community,” said Ingrid Daniels, Director of Cape Mental Health. “Children and adults with mental health needs have the same human rights as everyone else and at our 23rd Cape Town International Kite Festival, we will be celebrating everyone’s ‘Right to Fly’, to be accepted, respected and included.”

Cape Mental Health provides innovative and effective mental health services to people in poorly resourced communities in the Western Cape. This non-profit organisation has been active for 104 years and continues to work towards a society where people with intellectual and psychiatric disabilities are included in community life and have access to education, training, work and social opportunities.

The Delai Lama said: “It is our prime purpose in life to help others.” It is up to us to decide how we want to go about helping – with our time, our money, or dirtying our hands raising awareness of a pandemic, such as mental illness, which has been swept under the rug for too long.

So come, bring the family, and have fun at the 23rd Cape Town International Kite Festival on 28 and 29 October in Muizenberg, Cape Town in support of Cape Mental Health.

Kiters from China, England, Germany, Netherlands, South Africa and the USA will be there to show that almost anything can fly, with fish, dragons and even a little pig adorning the sky. 

WHAT TO EXPECT

There will be free kite-making workshops for children and adults as well as live entertainment, rides, a children’s play area and food market. Visitors are welcome to bring along a picnic.

WHERE

The Cape Town International Kite Festival happens on (and above) Zandvlei Nature Reserve, Muizenberg (corner Axminster and The Row). Open from 10:00 to 18:00 daily, the event offers lots of parking and easy access by train (False Bay or Muizenberg stations).

ALL PROCEEDS GO TO CAPE MENTAL HEALTH 

Entry is R40 (R15 for children 12 years and under). Tickets will be available online and at the gate.

 For more information call 021 447 9040, email info@cmh.org.za, visit www.capementalhealth.co.za or follow them on Facebook @CapeMentalHealth or Twitter @CMH_NGO.

 

 

Take good care of your mental health.

Love,